Surgical Instruments

  1. Non-Reflective Instruments Minimize Glare when Working under Lights

    Non-Reflective Instruments Minimize Glare when Working under Lights

    Whether you are working with your surgical instruments under bright lights or using a microscope, non-reflective black surgical instruments offer a distinct advantage. The titanium coating not only hardens and protects the cutting edge, but it also minimizes reflection from the surface of your instruments while you are working. They are corrosion resistant and biocompatible.  See Selection
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  2. How to Clean Surgical Instruments Using an Ultrasonic Cleaner

    How to Clean Surgical Instruments Using an Ultrasonic Cleaner

    Prior to sterilizing surgical instruments, it is a good idea to make sure you have cleaned them to remove blood, tissue and all other organic material.  If soiled materials dries or is baked onto the instruments, it will interfere with microbial inaction and can compromise the sterilization process. Cleaning is the removal of foreign material (e.g., soil and organic material) from objects and is normally accomplished using water with detergents or enzymatic products. The most common type of mechanical automatic cleaner is the ultrasonic cleaner. Ultrasonic cleaners are used in conjunction with detergents and enzymatic cleaners.  Ultrasonic cleaning removes particulates by cavitation (bubbles) and implosion. Waves of acoustic energy are transmitted in aqueous solutions and disrupt the bonds that hold particulate m
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  3. Get a Clean Consistent Cut Every Time with Biopsy Punches

    Get a Clean Consistent Cut Every Time with Biopsy Punches

    Clean, Consistent Cut Every Time When you need to quickly take minimally invasive, small samples, the biopsy punch is an easy choice. The biopsy punch is a hand held, pencil-shaped instrument with a slender, pencil-like body. It is lightweight with a hollow, circular, stainless steel, cutting tip. In 1887 Edward Lawrence Keyes, the first president of the American Association of Genitourinary Surgeons, was the first doctor who documented the importance of using the biopsy punch for dermatological diagnostics. He observed that the skin tissue samples can be obtained without complications, minimal bleeding and no need for suturing. Uses for Biopsy Punches Punches are not solely used in dermatology. Biopsy punches are also designed for therapeutics,
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  4. How Do I Select Appropriate Surgical Instruments for My Application?

    How Do I Select Appropriate Surgical Instruments for My Application?

    When you are selecting surgical instruments for a procedure, here are a few key points to consider What procedure are you performing? Published research papers usually indicate which instruments other researchers have used for similar procedures. The correct surgical instrument for a particular procedure makes a difference on the outcome of that technique. What is the size of your subject? An instrument that is perfect for a 200­–300 g rat (about 22–25 cm long) may not be the best choice for a neo-natal mouse of about 15 g (about 1–2.5 cm long). How often will the instrument be used? If you perform more than 100 cuts per day, a pair of titanium scissors or a pair of scissors with tungsten carbide inserts would be worth considering. They stay sharp longer.
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  5. Surgical Instrument Care and Handling

    Surgical Instrument Care and Handling

    The proper care and handling of your valuable surgical instruments will improve their longevity and function. Choose a protocol appropriate for your environment from the cleaning techniques below. See the videos here. RINSING Immediately after use, rinse instruments under warm or cool running water to remove all blood, body fluids and tissue. Dried soils may damage the instrument surface and make cleaning very difficult. Do not use hot water as this will coagulate proteinous substances. CLEANING TECHNIQUES Time, temperature, and agitation play important roles in the cleaning process. Time — the efficiency of cleaning chemicals is often time dependant Temperature — higher temperature cleaning solutions result in better cleaning Agitation — whether manual or ultrasonic, it is helpful in loo
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  6. Caring for your Surgical Instrument Investment

    Caring for your Surgical Instrument Investment

    What's the difference between cleaning, disinfecting and sterilizing? Let's take a look. This is the first in a series of four videos to discuss some best practices in caring for your surgical instrument investment.   In video #2, you can see how to manually clean surgical instruments. It is loaded with tips. This video is the second in a series of four to discuss some best practices in caring for your surgical instrument investment.    In video #3, you can see how to mechanically clean surgical instruments using an ultrasonic cleaner. This video is loaded with tips. This video is the third in a series of four to discuss some best practices in caring for your surgical instrument in
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  7. WPI Instruments featured in JoVE Video on Cross-Pollination

    WPI Instruments featured in JoVE Video on Cross-Pollination

    WPI surgical instruments were recently featured in a JoVE video that demonstrates a new method for cross pollinating grasses.   More Info Jiang, H., Barbier, H., Brutnell, T. Methods for Performing Crosses in Setaria viridis, a New Model System for the Grasses. J. Vis. Exp. (80), e50527, doi:10.3791/50527 (2013).
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  8. New Product: Pickup Tweezers

    New Product: Pickup Tweezers

    WPI now offers suction tweezers that are ideal for picking up small objects with a flat surface. The Pickup Tweezers are perfect for handling and positioning coverslips, removing small tissues from a solution or manipulation of small electronic components. The Pickup Tweezers (#504523) require no power or batteries, and are safe from all electrostatic discharge. This kit includes the metal body (handle), a straight metal needle, an angled metal needle, three rubber cups (4, 6 and 9mm diameter) and a lubricant set. When your fingers are just too big, and standard tweezers are awkward, the Pickup Tweezers are perfect.
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  9. Which Alloy is Best for My Surgical Instruments?

    Which Alloy is Best for My Surgical Instruments?

    Inox, Titanium, Dumoxel®, Dumastar®, Antimagnetic... Have you ever looked at the variety of metal alloys for surgical instruments and laboratory tools and wondered which is best for your needs? Here's a brief rundown. Stainless Steel (Inox) - Our standard line of instruments are manufactured of highest quality materials, they are made of austenitic 316 steel commonly known as “surgical steel” or “marine grade steel.” Stainless steel, also known as Inox (from the French word "inoxydable"), is highly corrosion resistant and it is a common choice of material for biomedical implants or body piercing jewelery. It is in compliance with ASTM F138. This WPI line is an excellent alternative to German surgical instruments. The high-quality, corrosion-resistant instruments are available at a fraction of
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  10. Bovie Part Number Matrix

    Bovie Part Number Matrix

    Use the table below to compare WPI and Bovie part numbers. WPI P/N Bovie P/N Description 500383 NS10 Lighting, Flexible Specialty 500384 AB03 Micro Bur Handle, 1225 rpm 500385 AB04 Micro Burr Handle, 1225 rpm 500386
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